Life Without Plastic

 Just recently, Mr. Kay bought 50 sustainable sporks from Life Without Plastics for Team Marine. These sporks are made of metal and they fold up and fit into organic drawstring bags. Team Marine first heard of this company from attending the POPS Youth Summit, where we received free sporks for our lunch. Life Without Plastics is a company founded in 2006, focusing on alternatives to plastic products. In addition to their sporks, they sell stainless steel food containers, reusable bags, as well as toys, pet products and school supplies.

They also donated ten free sporks to us and offered a partnership. We look forward to great collaborations with this company. Thank you Life Without Plastics!

Their website is: LifeWithoutPlastic.com

LWP bloghttp://www.LifeWithoutPlasticBlog.com
LWP twitterhttp://twitter.com/LifeWoutPlastic
LWP facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/LifeWithoutPlastic

 

Tweeting Sweet Memories of Wyoming

This past July, Team Marine senior, Adrienne Hino, was awarded an Earthwatch fellowship in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, where she researched, collected, and analyzed quantitative data on the nest shrubs and surrounding shrubs of songbirds, which contributed to a soon-to-be published scientific study addressing how nest shrub density affects nest success in yellow warblers, black-headed grosbeaks, American robins, and song sparrows in the Jackson Hole area. Using nest shrub density as an indication of how much human development exists in areas surrounding songbird habitats, the objective of the study was to measure the extent to which anthropogenic effects are taking on songbird populations and the environment. Her fellowship required collecting data and observing songbird habitats. She also gave a formal presentation to the Teton Science School in regards to the results of the 11 days she worked on the study. Adrienne often shares how much pride she takes in her contribution to the project because, while she was only able to work on it for 11 days, she was able to see firsthand the devastating effects humans are having on the environment from a very unique perspective. She continues to encourage her fellow team members to seek similar opportunities, “My fellowship experience was extremely educationally rewarding because it allowed me to conduct research outside of a traditional classroom setting and make a meaningful contribution to science. This experience meant so much to me because it offered me the opportunity, just as Team Marine does, to merge my love for nature and my passion for science.  It wasn’t until my trip in Wyoming, where I was immersed in nature, that I really realized the vitality of preserving our environment.” Being able to be within nature, she wasn’t just able to recognize a need for preservation of our environment, but she was also able to develop a true appreciation for and share a connection with nature. Reflecting back on the most valuable aspects of her trip, Adrienne expresses, “This experience has really taught me the importance in having the utmost patience, compassion, and pride in everything you do. I hope to use these values to create positive change in the world, as I continue to combat environmental issues.” Finally, she says, “Thank you so much to Renee Klein for encouraging me to apply for the fellowship, The Earthwatch Institute for providing me with such an amazing opportunity, and the Teton Science School for providing me such an amazing learning environment.”

To view more about the Songbirds of the Rockies Expedition, please see the official blog: http://songbirdsoftherockies.blogspot.com/

 

 

First Gurgle 2012

This past week, the weather brought on a small, yet significant, amount of rain. So on November 16th, Team Marine walked to the Santa Monica Storm Drain to collect trash that was piled on the beach. Upon arrival,Team Marine split into three groups in order to collect as much trash as possible. In the storm drain itself, there were beach balls, plastic cups, plastic water bottles, cigarette buts, and so much more debris mixed in with leaves, water, and sand. We even found a reusable water bottle among the trash! With the combination of residue, trash and water, the storm drain also contained various forms of a “mystery foam-like substance”. This was truly a disgusting sight. The groups that walked along the shore found enough trash to fill our largest bucket at least four times. From the trash found in the storm drain, we filled four large bags. Thankfully a Santa Monica maintenance truck was driving on the bike path and we were given a shovel to efficiently scoop up the trash. When we got back to Samo we thoroughly washed our buckets and gloves to remove any chemicals that had contaminated them. Participating in this beach clean up was rewarding, but the amount of waste we found we found was appalling. This beach clean up was another accomplishment of Team Marine that helped to aid marine life in the Santa Monica Bay.

 

By Mia Scalise

POPS Youth Summit



This past Saturday, November 3rd, Team Marine attended the Plastic Ocean Pollution Solutions Youth Speaker Training, at the Main Street Google headquarters. The event was an excellent opportunity to learn even more about the 20 percent of plastics that are unaccounted for –and end up in our oceans, and our streets– as well as a chance to learn about how to speak publicly about environmental issues. The event was led by Algalita Marine Research Institute representatives Anna Cummins, Lindsey Jurca, Marieta Francis, and Jordan Howard. The team gave an informative power point about plastic pollution, and it’s causes, dangers, and solutions. Every student at the summit was provided with a binder containing each individual slide of the power point, and a thumb drive with a version accessible through a computer, so that we would be able to spread our message with a ready made presentation.

Before lunch, a panel of four activists against single use plastics spoke about their experiences in past years: Captain Charles Moore (founder of the Algalita Marine Research Institute), Mark Wystrach (founder of The People’s Movement, a clothing company that uses recycled materials), Ann Garth (a 14-year-old advocate for plastic pollution solutions), and Marcus Eriksen (founder of the 5 Gyres organization). Each speaker answered questions about what motivated them to continue their fight against single use plastics, and how they started out as environmental activists.

Throughout the day, all of the students participated in public speaking exercises, some led by the Algalita team, and some led by actor Brian Palermo. We were taught how to present ourselves in a professional manner while speaking, and how to structure presentations in an organized manner. We then made plans for future presentations to the City Council of Santa Monica, the Santa Monica Malibu School District Board of Education, and politicians in Sacramento. Students had the opportunity to make partnerships with other student groups who attended the Summit, and plan for joint events. Team Marine members got to know other youth activists, and made many useful connections with other schools in California.

All meals were provided, and students were lucky enough to get a tour of the Google building during the break. All in all, the Youth Summit was a great opportunity to learn public speaking skills, and increase our knowledge of plastic pollution.

By Ellie Reynolds

Riding Currents

Team Marine attended an event at the California Yacht Club in Marina Del Rey, CA on this Wednesday, October 10 following docking of the Riding Currents craft along its ocean journey. Riding Currents is a project started by Billy Dutton to raise awareness about plastic pollution and alternative energy. They have outfitted a 22-foot duffy boat with solar panels and lithium-ion batteries, sailing from Santa Barbara, CA to Ensenada, Mexico, more than 350 miles. They will make the entire journey emissions-free, and along the way, they will collect water samples and drag a trawl behind the boat to collect plastic debris.

 

 

Marcus Eriksen, founder of the organization 5gyres, gave a riveting presentation at the event on his travels around the world by boat, finding the high density of plastic pollution in all 5 major oceanic gyres and other patches throughout the seas.

Several members of Team Marine attended the event and our own Matilda Mead spoke about efforts to reduce the use of single-use plastics, while wearing a costume made of plastic cutlery that found its way to the Santa Monica beach.

 

 

Finally, we toured the Riding Currents boat and Billy showed us the impressive arrangement of batteries below the seat cushions and the tiny, but powerful, electric motor that has carried them thousands of miles down the California coast.

 

 

By Matthew Ware

National Plug-In Day

On Sunday September 23rd, Team Marine members travelled to El Segundo where National Plug In Day was hosted. The Automobile Driving Museum (ADM) is a destination for anyone who loves cars and the role they have had in our lives. On National Plug In Day, a variety of electric cars were displayed. We were presented about how the cars have environmentally sustainable engines.

 

 

Also at the event was nationally known teen-icon Jordan Howard. She attended the Environmental Charter High School and is influencing the youth to become more green. With the electric vehicles and highly acclaimed representatives, National Plug In Day created a nationwide observance drawing global attention to the environmental, economic and other benefits of plug-in electric cars.

 

 

By Mia Scalise

Recycling Bin Cleaning Day

Recently Team Marine had a “Recycling Bin Wash” where we collected all the dirty or broken recycling bins from our school. We thoroughly cleaned all the junk and gunk from the bins to the highest standard. We washed these bins with soap, sponges and limited water.  With the help of our student volunteers and Team Marine members we cleaned a total of 23 recycling bins. Some bins had broken handles but with the help of our handy team members these were all mended and fixed. The Bin Washing was so successful that Team Marine plans to do this every two weeks.

 

Remember To Recycle!!!